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Rolling Stones

 


The Rolling Stones are an English rock group that formed in London in 1962. First popular in Europe, they quickly became successful in North America during the “British Invasion” of the mid-60s. Since then, their worldwide sales are estimated at more than 200 million albums. In 1989, they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and in 2004, they ranked number 4 in Rolling Stone magazine’s 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. In 2008, Billboard magazine ranked the Rolling Stones at number ten on “The Billboard Hot 100 Top All-Time Artists”, and as the second most successful group in the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

The group was formed by Brian Jones, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ian Stewart, who met as schoolmates in Dartford, Kent. They took their name from a Muddy Waters song called “Rollin’ Stone Blues”, and made their live debut at London’s Marquee Club (minus Bill Wyman and Charlie Watts). They start playing pubs and clubs around the city and suburbs. Bill Wyman joined later that year (the popular story is that he was asked because he had his own amplifier).

In January 1963, Charlie Watts joined the Stones. The band gigged constantly, with residencies at venues like Ealing Jazz Club, Ken Colyer’s Studio 51, and Eel Pie Island in Twickenham. Their weekly performances at the Crawdaddy at Richmond’s Station Hotel resulted in ecstatic press reviews, and in April Andrew Loog Oldham saw them there and signed them to his management company the next day. He started the “Would you let your daughter marry a Rolling Stone” press campaign, which set the tone for their career.

Keith Richards and Mick Jagger were childhood friends and classmates in Dartford, Kent, until the Jaggers moved to Wilmington. Jagger had formed a garage band with Dick Taylor, mainly playing Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Howlin' Wolf and Bo Diddley material. Jagger was reacquainted with Keith Richards in 1960 at Dartford railway station. The Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records that Jagger carried revealed a common interest that prompted their musical partnership. Richards joined Jagger and Taylor at frequent meetings at Jagger's house. The meetings switched to Taylor's house in late 1961, where the three were joined by Alan Etherington and Bob Beckwith. They called themselves The Blue Boys.

In March 1962, the Blue Boys read about the Ealing Jazz Club in newspaper Jazz News and visited the place on 7 April 1962. The band members met Brian Jones there, as he sat in playing slide guitar with Alexis Korner's seminal London rhythm and blues band, Blues Incorporated, the band that also had future Rolling Stones members Ian Stewart and Charlie Watts. Before visiting the Ealing Jazz Club, the Blue Boys had sent a tape of their best recordings to Alexis Korner, who was impressed. After a meeting with Korner, Jagger and Richards started jamming with Blues Incorporated.

Brian Jones advertised for band mates in the Jazz News and Ian Stewart found a practice space and joined with Jones to start a rhythm and blues band playing Chicago blues. Shortly thereafter, Jagger, Taylor and Richards left Blues Incorporated to join Jones and Stewart in their effort. Also at the first rehearsal were guitarist Geoff Bradford and vocalist Brian Knight, both of whom declined to join the band citing objections to playing the Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley songs preferred by Jagger and Richards. In June 1962 the line-up was: Jagger, Jones, Richards, Stewart, Taylor, and drummer Tony Chapman. According to Richards, Jones christened the band during a phone call to Jazz News. When asked for a band name Jones saw a Muddy Waters LP lying on the floor of which one of the tracks was "Rollin' Stone".

The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in 1962 in London when multi-instrumentalist Brian Jones and pianist Ian Stewart were joined by vocalist Mick Jagger and guitarist Keith Richards.
Bassist Bill Wyman and drummer Charlie Watts completed the early lineup. Stewart, deemed unsuitable as a teen idol, was removed from the official lineup in 1963 but continued to work with the band as road manager and keyboardist until his death in 1985.
Jagger and Richards early on formed the songwriting partnership Jagger/Richards and gradually took over leadership of the band from the increasingly troubled and erratic Jones.
At first the group recorded mainly covers of American blues and R&B songs, but since the 1966 album Aftermath, their releases have mainly featured Jagger/Richards songs.
Mick Taylor replaced an incapacitated Jones shortly before Jones's death in 1969. Taylor quit in 1974, and was replaced in 1975 by Faces guitarist Ronnie Wood, who has remained with the band ever since.
Wyman left the Rolling Stones in 1992; bassist Darryl Jones, who is not an official band member, has worked with the group since 1994.
First popular in the UK and Europe, The Rolling Stones came to the US during the early 1960s "British Invasion".
The Rolling Stones have released 22 studio albums in the UK (24 in the US), eight concert albums (nine in the US) and numerous compilations; and have sold more than 200 million albums worldwide.
In July 2008 it was announced that the Rolling Stones were leaving EMI and signing with Vivendi's Universal Music, taking with them their entire catalogue stretching back to Sticky Fingers.

 

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70's Rock

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Members of this Group


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