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The Eagles

With five number one singles, 14 Top 40 hits, and four number one albums, the Eagles were among the most successful recording artists of the 1970s. At the end of the 20th century, two of those albums — Their Greatest Hits (1971-1975) and Hotel California — ranked among the ten best-selling albums ever, and the popularity of 2007's Long Road Out of Eden proved the Eagles' staying power in the new millennium. Though most of its members came from outside California, the group was closely identified with a country- and folk-tinged sound that initially found favor in Los Angeles during the late '60s, as championed by such bands as the Flying Burrito Brothers and Poco (both of which contributed members to the Eagles). But the band also drew upon traditional rock & roll styles and, in their later work, helped define the broadly popular rock sound that became known as classic rock. As a result, the Eagles achieved a perennial appeal among generations of music fans who continued to buy their records many years after they had split up, which helped inspire the Eagles' reunion in the mid-'90s.

The band was formed by four Los Angeles-based musicians who had migrated to the West Coast from other parts of the country. Singer/bassist Randy Meisner (born in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, on March 8, 1946) moved to L.A. in 1964 as part of a band originally called the Soul Survivors (not to be confused with the East Coast-based Soul Survivors, who scored a Top Five hit with "Expressway to Your Heart" in 1967) and later renamed the Poor. He became a founding member of Poco in 1968, but left the band prior to the release of its debut album in order to join the Stone Canyon Band, the backup group for Rick Nelson. Meanwhile, singer/guitarist/banjoist/mandolinist Bernie Leadon (born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on July 19, 1947) arrived in L.A. in 1967 as a member of Hearts and Flowers, later joining Dillard & Clark and then the Flying Burrito Brothers. Singer/drummer Don Henley (born in Gilmer, Texas, on July 22, 1947) moved to L.A. in June 1970 with his band Shiloh, which made one self-titled album for Amos Records before breaking up. Finally, Glenn Frey (born in Detroit, Michigan, on November 6, 1948) performed in his hometown and served as a backup musician for Bob Seger before moving to L.A. in the summer of 1968. He formed the duo Longbranch Pennywhistle with J.D. Souther, and the two musicians signed to Amos Records, which released their self-titled album in 1969.


Director Alison Ellwood, along with Producer (and Academy Award-winning documentarian), Alex Gibney, meticulously crafts an intimate patchwork of rare archival material, concert footage, and unseen home movies exploring the evolution and enduring popularity of one of America's truly definitive bands. Inspired by the vibrant Los Angeles music scene, Glenn Frey and Don Henley left Linda Ronstadt's backup band in 1971 to team with Bernie Leadon and Randy Meisner and form the Eagles. While personal stories from band members (later including Don Felder, Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmit), managers, and music-industry luminaries frame the narrative, it's the unexpected moments-recording sessions, backstage interactions, and even a whimsical sequence from the Desperado cover shoot-that convey the extraordinary bond linking artists, music, and the times (an era when country-tinged rock and finely-honed harmonies spoke to a nation still reeling from unrest). But the band was not impervious to its own unrest, and its conflicts prompted several departures and ultimately led to its demise (or long vacation). Part One follows the band from its formation in 1971 through its ascendancy in the 70's to the infamous unravelling in the fall of 1980. Part Two tracks the group from its reunion in 1994 through the triumphant Hell Freezes Over tour, the 2007 release of the album, The Long Road Out of Eden (which sold over 5-1/2 million copies, worldwide, and garnered the band its 5th and 6th GrammyR Awards), and its ongoing success as an international touring act. This history of the Eagles skips neither a beat nor a hit song, and we're reminded why the band's greatest hits collection (Vol. I) remains the best-selling album of the 20th century. - John Nein, Sundance Institute


The Eagles are an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California during the early 1970s.
The group chose the name Eagles as a nod to The Byrds.
With five #1 singles and six #1 albums, the Eagles were one of the most successful recording artists of the decade.
At the end of the 20th century, two of their albums, Eagles: Their Greatest Hits 1971–1975 and Hotel California, ranked among the 10 best-selling albums according to the Recording Industry Association of America.
They also have the best selling album in the U.S. to date with Eagles: Their Greatest Hits 1971–1975.

 

70's Rock

Already Gone
Heartache Tonight
Hotel California
Life In The Fast Lane
Lyin' Eyes
One Of These Nights
Take It Easy

Members of this Group


Hard__warE

doumtracy

Manfredo

amcato

Baby Blues

sunshinesuz

Jedizan

greizzz

MOMOFARIA

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